Individual, Independent, Inquirer

A positive learning orientation...gives our girls the edge

Individual

Each of us has a preferred learning and a preferred working style: some prefer visual learning, others learn more by listening, others by senses of touch or movement. Some of us are print oriented and learn more easily by reading; others learn best by interacting with other people.  Learners need to experience many different learning opportunities to understand their individual preferred learning style(s) and target this for success.  

Independent

Effective learning is enhanced when learning is active, a collaborative process, when we take responsibility for learning and takes learning risks. Achievement is enhanced for students when they are enabled to think independently, understand what they are doing and why they are doing it.

Inquirer

Each of us also has independent interests, passions and questions. We engage more in learning when motivated by our own desire to know, when there is purpose in learning, when we are inspired to seek new understandings. Senior girls are encouraged to engage in
challenging investigative projects that they formulate, negotiate, research and present.

In order to assist students in Senior School to become independent inquirers we hope to develop a 'positive learning orientation'*

A positive pattern: learning orientation

A negative pattern: performance orientation

  • Belief that effort leads to success
  • Belief that ability leads to success
  • Belief the one’s ability to improve and learn
  • Concern to be judged as able to perform
  • Preference for challenging task
  • Satisfaction from doing better than others
  • Personal satisfaction from success at difficult  tasks
  • Emphasis on competition, public evaluation
  • Problem solving and self-instructions when engaged in task
  • Helplessness: evaluate self negatively when task is difficult
  • Concern for improving one’s competence
  • Concern for proving one’s competence

*Watkins C., Carnell E., Lodge, C., Wagner P. and Whalley C. (2002) Effective Learning
Research Mattes no 17 Summer, London NSIN, Institute